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The Churchill Society
London.

The production of new wealth must precede common wealth,
otherwise there will only be common poverty.

Winston Churchill.


Schools

WHO WAS CHURCHILL?

CHRONOLOGY

THE MAIN INDEX

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WSC PORTRAIT BY CHANDOR

By courtesy of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery.

Sir Winston Spencer Churchill
painted by
Douglas Chandor
1897-1953

Oil on canvas 1946

Gift of Bernard Mannes Buruch 1960.

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CHRONOLOGY

Illustrated Monthly Calendar of WWII.

1939. 1940. 1941. 1942. 1943. 1944. 1945.

An outline of

The Second World War

To the amazement of the entire world,
Churchill was dismissed when the Conservative Party lost the election.

Part VIII.

POSTWAR

The wars of the 20th century are stories of unbelievable cruelty and barbarism. To say that they are a total disgrace to the entire human race is a gross understatement.

No species on earth sets about the scientific destruction of its own kind as does man.

So how did it all happen - and more important still will it happen again?

Dictators can only retain their power over the people by terror. But they must also have unlimited money to remain in power.

It is extraordinary to realise that Hitler - though a mass murderer of people in his own political party - was voted into power 'legally' in Germany.

With Germany in a state of total financial chaos due to hyper inflation, it is extraordinary to realise that Hitler - who never worked at a proper job or earned an honest penny during his entire life - came to power in Germany by promising to end their unemployment suffering by creating work for them. How - when work and earning money were totally unknown to him?

Such was the distress and shame of German people that in their distress they believed him.

So who financed Hitler's rise to power?

This has never been properly explained.

It should be, for without someone paying his bills, he could never have gained power.

Later when he became Chancellor, the big German industrialists backed him - to ward off their own bankruptcies. They then later shamefully enriched themselves by using slave labour.

Why is it that when war happens, money never seems to be a problem any longer?

Answer these questions and you will know how to prevent wars.

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There are hundreds of books on the wars of the 20th century but the best are Churchill's own accounts Bibliography (complete with the text of all his telegrams) of the war. They are in the six volumes entitled THE SECOND WORLD WAR. You will not be able to put the books down!

And so it was that a merciful peace returned to all the shocked and grieving peoples of the world - on both sides - for good had triumphed over evil and the cruel and merciless rule of all the War Lord's (other than Stalin's) was ended. Neither Germany, Italy, or Japan, gained anything by going to war- but what they lost, and the suffering their victims and their own peoples endured - and what all the countries in the world lost and their terrible as a consequence of the arrogance a mere handful of wicked men , no-one can ever measure.

Before you read the final short pages, stop here and listen to the two movements of the finale of:-

THE CHURCHILL MUSIC

IN VICTORY MAGNANIMITY

and

IN PEACE GOODWILL.

THE CHURCHILL SOCIETY

London

owns the

Copyright of

THE CHURCHILL MUSIC

POSTWAR

Churchill was shocked, and very hurt by his rejection by the electorate - but did not show it.

When the election results were finally announced on July the 26th 1945, it was clear that the Labour Party had a big independent majority over all other parties in the new House of Commons.

Thus the nation's indomitable war leader, and for five years head of an extremely successful all party government, drove to Buckingham Palace at 7 pm to tender his resignation.

It was an almost inexplicable defeat of what was then was known as 'The National Government'.

It is difficult to envisage the sad scene at the Palace.

In his public statement Mr Churchill said:

"The decision of the British people has been recorded . I have therefore laid down the the charge which was placed upon me in darker times.....

It only remains for me to express to the British people my profound gratitude for the unflinching support which they have given me during my task and for the many expressions of kindness which they have shown towards their servant".

Note the use of the word ' servant' - which was how he so often described himself in the House of Commons.

The entire nation was stunned at his unexpected defeat.

He left office without any financial reward or even a pension - such pensions did not exist for politicians in those days and as a consequence he found to his horror that he could no longer afford to keep his beloved Chartwell.

When this news broke, a group of anonymous businessmen bought Chartwell and gave it to him on the understanding that it became the property of The National Trust when he died and that their names were never revealed.

As leader of the defeated Conservatives, now out of office, his predictions that Socialist policies would be unable to deliver the speedy relief of all the shortages that war had enforced upon the population turned out to be only too true. He knew this could only be done speedily if free enterprise was allowed to flourish.

As soon as they took control the Labour government brought in even more restrictions, which created more shortages than had existed during the war - all because of their pedantic and bureaucratic ideologies. Thus it was that bread became rationed for the first time . . . and this AFTER the war had been won!

The author of this article was a 16 years of age at the time and remembers it as a time of far worse deprivation than during the war years. They were deeply dark and depressing years when everything was filthy and worn out and everyone in despair as to where to get what they so badly needed. It was a time when black marketeers thrived - they were known as "Spivs".

It took another 10 years of real hardship before the people realised that a Socialist government was hopeless at providing for the people and that left if alone, the people could swiftly do it all for themselves.

In many ways the years after the war were harder to endure than those during the war for the people were not being led well and were irritable and miserable.

 Churchill's beloved car.

 

The Times Newspaper. 

20th November 1997. 

By Kevan Eason. 

MOTORING EDITOR

It was hardly stately transport for a wartime leader of such stature, but Winston Churchill loved his little Austin, so much so that he refused to exchange it for something more ostentatious. 
 
When Lady Churchill decided to trade the black Austin 10 in for a grander model befitting her husband's position, he ordered her to go back to the dealer and bring his Austin home. 
 
Churchill had a curious attachment to his Austin, one of the most unprepossessing models of the prewar years and manufactured at a time when Roll Royce, Daimler, Bentley, and Lanchester were all making majestic models with worldwide reputations for quality and performance. 

Reputation obviously did not matter to Churchill as much as reliability or perhaps he had high regard for Herbert Austin, founder of the Birmingham car maker and a resolute patriot. In any event, the logbook shows Churchill's signature as the first owner, taking delivery of EYII 409 on June 1938. The little four-door is hardly luxurious, its red leather interior no more than spartan and the sit-up-and-beg driving seat seemingly too small for Churchill's ample frame. Even the ashtray seems hardly big enough to cope with his legendary cigars, though there is a sliding sunroof and folding windscreen. 
 
Power was also not a premium feature: the car's l,1125cc, four-cylinder could generate only 10 horse power so a fair wind at the rear would he needed to struggle past the 40 mph mark. The Austin did have one exclusive feature: a new type of pressed steel "easy clean"  spoked wheels, though it is hard to imagine the former Prime Minister going at them with bucket and sponge. 

Churchill used the car throughout the war years famously photographed by the bonnet of the Austin during one of his frequent outings. He sold the car in 1950 but it was bought at auction in 1967 by the sixth Marquess of Bath for £1,350 and kept at the Longleat estate in Wiltshire. A restoration in 1983, costing £6,335, has put the car in the near-new condition that Churchill enjoyed. The present marquess is selling the car to clear space as part of a rearrangement of his estate. 

Ed Note. 

The car was expected to fetch between £4,000 and £6,000.  In the event it sold at auction for £64,000 to an anonymous Swiss buyer and has now presumably left England.

This car is important - not because it was owned by Churchill - but because of how it portrays his character.

It is a disgrace that it was not purchased by Englishmen. It should have remained in this country.

The sale is yet another example how we fail to teach our children about our history and why a great man - is a great man.

 

It takes modern industry at least four years to develop and manufacture a new product and then another two or three years in times of great shortages for there to be sufficient goods for the prices to come down to a level at which ordinary people can afford to pay. So it was not until ten years after the war (1955) that shortages began to disappear. These years were indeed very bleak times in Europe.

However, being defeated in the election - though it greatly upset Churchill at the time - was not the end of his political career. He led the Conservative Party in opposition .

Churchill with his acute world political perceptions, could not approve of what he called Labour's policy of "scuttle", in their premature granting of independence to India and Burma - though he never voted against the legislation. He foresaw the horrendous massacres that ensued after Independence was granted to India.

On March 5, 1946, at Fulton Missouri, in the presence of President Truman, he delivered a famous address entitled:-

THE SINEWS OF POWER

THE COLD WAR

Fulton, Missouri,

5th March I946

Stop here and read this speech for in it he expounds the two central themes of his postwar view of the world: ie the need for Britain and the United States to stand united and as protectors of the peace against the menace of Soviet Communistic expansion and trouble making, which . . as he said in the most telling of catch phrases . . . had brought down an " IRON CURTAIN" right across Europe. The speech brought into existence NATO. The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation which exists to this day.

THE IRON CURTAIN was in fact a barbed wire, 500 yard wide barrier of cleared land with watch towers spaced 500 yards from each and which extended over hundreds and hundreds of miles across central Europe from the North Sea right down through Eastern Europe to Trieste in the Adriatic sea. It was guarded by dogs and soldiers in watch towers. were hidden all along it. Where the barrier went through towns and cities the people on each side lost contact with each other for over 30 years. Hundreds of people were killed trying to escape through it, or over the walls, or in tunnels under it - though many escape successfully to the West. The most famous part of this barrier was the Berlin section known as The Berlin Wall. It was torn down by the people in huge and joyous relief and excitement when Communism collapsed in 1989 thanks to the policies followed by the great American Statesman - President Reagan.

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Now the war was over, and being relieved of his Prime Ministerial duties Churchill now had time once more to write books and to earn money. Having no pension, (In those days prime ministers did not receive them) he had urgently to provide for his family, so he busied himself with his great history, The Second World War, six volumes (1948-53).

You should read these books - you will not be able to put them down until the very last page!

Another general election took place in February 1950. The Labour Party just held on but a further one took place in October 1951. The Conservatives were then returned with a narrow majority of 26, and Churchill became prime minister for the second time.

He formed a government in which the more liberal Conservatives predominated, though the Liberal Party itself declined Churchill's suggestion of office.

De-rationing, decontrolling, massive house building and repair, creating foreign earnings and safe-guarding the nation's gold reserves and the return of the nationalised steel and road transport industries to private ownership were his priorities.

But Churchill was old and tired. He saw things on a world scale and the protection of the peace and the avoidance of more war were the issues which dominated his mind all the time. One of his first acts as Prime Minister was to visit Washington (and also Ottawa) in January 1952 to repair the friendship between the UK and the USA which he felt had been damaged by the Socialists.

The Korean War, had broken out and there were serious issues to be discussed about the proliferation of the atomic bomb (a weapon that previously only the USA and the UK had exclusively possessed and which, by the threat of its use, the West was able to force the Communists to step carefully in their international expansionist intrigues).

Churchill's famous Zurich plea for a European Union did not result in his government participating; he made it clear that we should not be part of it. He would never have dreamt of England giving up its own currency or its independence. He confined himself to an approval of what had been achieved to date and a promise to station British troops on the Continent for as long as the threat of Russian invasion existed.

1953 saw the death of the King and the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, both historic events which seemed at the time to be the end of an era and a turning point towards a better life for the British people.

The Queen wished Churchill to become the DUKE OF LONDON but he declined. However he reluctantly - and only to please his beloved young Queen and to honour the memory and courage of her parents during the war - accepted from her The Order of the Garter which is only given by the Sovereign and at his or her own personal desire.

 

See Churchill's Coat of Arms at the top of these pages.

For his marvellous writing and speeches he received the Nobel Prize for Literature. (An award made possible by an industrialist's fortune made by the mass production of weapon dynamite - if you please!)

Churchill suffered a stroke (a blood clot in the brain) in June 1953, which caused partial paralysis, but he made a remarkable recovery and met his old soldier friend President Eisenhower in December. Churchill went to Washington in June 1954 to encourage US to bring an end to the war in Indochina.

In 1955, and with the agreement of the Americans and the Commonwealth, Churchill ordered the British manufacture of a hydrogen bomb. He justified it by saying that it was "arming to parley". He knew that the only argument Stalin and the Russian Communists understood and respected was force.

Upon his 80th birthday, Nov. 30, 1954, there was held a unique all-party ceremony of affection and tribute to him in Westminster Hall. You can read the wording of that tribute for I have placed it upon the title page of of Lady Churchill's orchestral score of:-

THE CHURCHILL MUSIC.

On April 5, 1955, Churchill went to his young Queen and tendered his resignation.

Churchill remained in the House of Commons (declining a peerage) to become "father of the house" (the affectionate term given to the longest serving member).

In 1959, he fought and won another election. He also completed another huge work. A History of the English Speaking Peoples, in four volumes. Fascinating reading.

Such was the love of the American people for Churchill that upon April 9th, 1963, he was accorded the unique distinction of having an Honorary U.S. Citizenship conferred on him by an Act of Congress.

His death at his London home on Jan. 24, 1965, was followed by a State Funeral at which almost the whole world paid tribute. He was buried in the family grave in Bladon churchyard, Oxfordshire and within sight of Blenheim Palace his birthplace . . and where this extraordinary story began - 89 years earlier.

 

Churchill's State Funeral

Churchill's State Funeral

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PRIME MINISTER AGAIN

HONOURS BESTOWED.

STATE FUNERAL

Frontispiece

MAIN INDEX

The purpose of these pages is to tell the story of Churchill's life - not to give a detailed account of the wars he was involved in, for that is a vast subject.

To obtain an idea of the cause and magnitude of the war, examine the monthly calendar for each year - they include many photographs.

It is important to remember that heavy censorship of news took place throughout them, and therefore knowledge of many of these events was not available until long after they happened - or until after the wars had ended.

Illustrated Monthly Calendar of WWII.

1940.

January

February

March

April

1940.

May

June

July

August

1940.

September

October

November

December

1941.

January

February

March

April

1941.

May

June

July

August

1941.

September

October

November

December

1942.

January

February

March

April

1942.

May

June

July

August

1942.

September

October

November

December

1943.

January

February

March

April

1943.

May

June

July

August

1943.

September

October

November

December

1944.

January

February

March

April

1944.

May

June

July

August

1944.

September

October

November

December

1945.

January

February

March

April

1945,

May

June

July

August

 

Explanatory notes are given against some of these dates, but to read about particular battles or political events please go to Bibliography

CHURCHILL'S SPEECHES The Full Texts from 1936 to 1946.

Short biography of President Roosevelt
Short biography of General Eisenhower
Short biography of President Truman
Short biography of Hitler
Short biography of Stalin
Short biography of Mussolini
Short biography of The Japanese War Lords

List of all the Ranks in the British Armed Forces

British Prime Ministers

History of No 10 Downing Street

 

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...................Ladybird.

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