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The Churchill Society
London.

The longer you can look back, the farther you can look forward.

Winston Churchill

The Royal College of Physicians,

London.
March 2nd 1944.


Schools

WHO WAS CHURCHILL?


CHRONOLOGY

THE MAIN INDEX

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Flanders PoppyThe purpose of these pages is to tell the story of Churchill's life - not to give a detailed account of the wars he was involved in, for that is a vast subject.

Month by month factual and photographic calendars of the Ist World War
1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918.

 It is important to remember that heavy censorship of news took place throughout them, and therefore knowledge of many of these events was not available until long after they happened - or until after the wars had ended.

Explanatory notes are given against some of these dates, but to read about particular battles or political events please go to Bibliography

 

The Scandal of The Great War Teenage Soldiers

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1919.

Elections took place on December 14th 1918 and , due to so many soldiers being overseas, the results were not declared until a fortnight later.

Churchill retained his Dundee seat with a large majority and was then appointed by the Prime Minister Lloyd George, to be Secretary of State at the War Office. Here he had the huge task of demobilising three and half million exhausted soldiers. This task posed great problems. An army of a million men was required to occupy the Rhine and 14,000 British soldiers were still engaged in fighting in Russia. All agreed that his demobilisation plans were fair, humane and well managed but Churchill alone - foresaw the threat of Communism. At a public meeting he said:-

"of all the tyrannies in history, the Bolshevik tyranny is the worst, the most destructive, the most degrading; the atrocities committed under Lenin and Trotsky were incomparably more hideous, on a larger scale, and more numerous than for any which the Kaiser is responsible"

Soon after this speech he was scandalised that the British government sent back to Russia half a million Russian soldiers taken by the Germans - all trained men - who would be forced to join the armies of Lenin and Trotsky - fighting against our small British forces who were attempting to keep open the lines of supplies and so reinforce the anti-Bolsheviks. He wrote to the Prime Minister . . .

"This is one of the capital blunders in the history of the world".

Had Churchill's view prevailed the Bolsheviks could have been beaten and Russia would never have suffered under communism. His views were ridiculed in both Parliament and the press.

About this time Churchill inherited from a distant cousin an estate in Northern Ireland. Its income was handsome and ended his personal financial worries. But sorrow was to waylay him and his wife again, when their two and a half year old daughter Marigold suddenly died of meningitis. They were both devastated.

After the war Churchill was appointed Secretary for War (a bit late you might say!) and foreseeing no future European conflicts that could lead to war, he set about reducing military expenditure with great zeal.

A Peace Treaty had to be arranged. It became known as The Treaty of Versailles. It was a mixture of American idealism with the formation of  and their inexperience in European politics and, on the part of the French, revenge - which the British understood - but could not restrain.

Churchill addressed the Imperial Conference in London where he set out his vision for the reconciliation of France and Germany.

"The aim"  he said   "is to get an appeasement of the fearful hatreds and antagonisms which exist in Europe to enable the world to settle down".   Britain's role should be   "the ally of France and the friend of Germany"  and to help to mitigate  "the frightful rancour fear and hatred between the two countries",  for these hatreds would   "most certainly fester and within a generation and bring about a renewal of the struggle which has only just ended".

Churchill was alarmed at the harsh terms of The Treaty of Versailles. He was scorned in the press for saying so.

He was proved right.

The United States of America refused to become a member of The League of Nations and followed an 'isolationist' policy from the affairs of Europe.

Germany was excluded until 1926; and even after being admitted many Germans looked on the League as a 'club of victors'.

The League was highly regarded by people all over the world. In Britain alone 400,000 people showed their support for it by joining the League of Nations Union, a body which aimed to promote the League's work in the country - but when the time came it proved worthless.

The chronology of Churchill's First World War years is as follows;-

1911-15 First Lord of the Admiralty.

1915 Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

1915-16 On active war service in France.

1917-18 Minister of Munitions.

Churchill was 45 years of age when the war ended.

It is not possible here to write at length about the period 1919 to 1922 as the subject is too large. Suffice it to say that Churchill held high office and gained yet more experience and knowledge of government.

The chronology of the next 20 years is as follows:-

1919-21 Secretary of State for War and Air

1921-22 Secretary of State for the Colonies

1992-24 Out of Parliament

1923-31 Publishes The World Crisis which earns him sufficient money to buy Chartwell.

1924-29 Chancellor of the Exchequer

1924-25 MP for Epping

1925 Rejoins Conservative Party

1930 Publishes My Early Life

1932 Publishes Thoughts and Adventures

1933-38 Publishes Marlborough: His Life and Times

1937 Publishes Great Contemporaries

1939 Publishes Step by Step

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Flanders PoppyThe purpose of these pages is to tell the story of Churchill's life - not to give a detailed account of the wars he was involved in, for that is a vast subject.

Month by month factual and photographic calendars of the Ist World War

1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918.

It is important to remember that heavy censorship of news took place throughout them, and therefore knowledge of many of these events was not available until long after they happened - or until after the wars had ended. Morevover, the experiences of the soldiers were so terrible, that of the the few who returned, none spoke of them for many many years.

Explanatory notes are given against some of these dates, but to read about particular battles or political events please go to Bibliography

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THE STORY OF THE GREAT WAR.

1914.

The causes
of the Gt War.

1914.

Unfolding events
in the summer.

1914.

Autumn and early
winter

 

1915.

 

1916.

 

1917.

 

1918.

Armistice.

 

1919.

The aftermath.

The 1920's

 

. .SCHOOL INDEX .

 CHRONOLOGY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

THE MAIN INDEX

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Contact the society.

 

 

...................Ladybird.

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